Google is getting into the business of selling TV ads

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Google’s move into traditional TV ad inventory sales comes at a time when its YouTube platform is coming under some fire from brands who don’t want their ads playing in front of less-than-appropriate videos.

Google announced in a blog post that it will begin offering traditional TV inventory through its DoubleClick Bid Manager in the U.S. The company will integrate with WideOrbit, clypd and Google Fiber to provide access to national, local and addressable TV inventory.

“Historically, TV and digital advertising have been bought and measured through different systems and currencies. By adding traditional TV buying into DoubleClick Bid Manager, we are taking the first step towards allowing advertisers and agencies to manage their video campaigns across digital and linear TV, in a more efficient and effective way,” wrote Rany Ng, director of product management at Google.

Google is also saying it will provide ad buyers with “impact-based metrics” that will measure things like lift based on Google and YouTube searches that occur after an ad airs.

For broadcasters and programmers, Google said DoubleClick will provide access to different types of ad buyers including advanced TV buying groups in agencies, digital-first advertisers and global advertisers.

RELATED: Google submits YouTube to Media Ratings Council audit

Google’s move into traditional TV ad inventory sales comes at a time when its YouTube platform is coming under some fire from brands who don’t want their ads playing in front of less-than-appropriate videos.

Recently, Google agreed to let the Media Ratings Council audit its YouTube viewer metrics. The review, which Facebook also submitted to, will provide more transparency for brands and ad buyers looking to buy inventory on YouTube.

Interestingly, YouTube’s traditional TV ad push comes just weeks after the company officially launched its YouTube TV virtual MVPD, the latest in a long line of nontraditional TV distribution platforms that delivers smaller bundles of channels via the internet.