Dish Network trademarks Ollo for mobile video, high-speed Internet and voice products

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Dish Network (Nasdaq: DISH) may be developing new mobile video, high-speed Internet and voice products that could use the brand Ollo, according to applications obtained by FierceCable that the satellite TV distributor filed recently at the U.S. Patent & Trademark Office.

According to two trademark applications Dish filed for Ollo on Nov. 9, the company would like to be able to use the brand for both mobile equipment and services, including mobile phones, tablets, and telecommunications services. Among the services Dish says the brand could be used for are wireless video, voice and broadband Internet access.

Dish Network has been investing heavily in wireless spectrum, and has asked the FCC for permission to use spectrum from TerreStar and DBSD North America to offer subscribers mobile video and high-speed Internet service. Ollo could be a brand that Dish is considering for new products that it will deliver with the wireless spectrum.

Dish has also filed applications for three other unique brands that it may be considering for mobile video products. On Sept. 6, it filed trademark applications for the brands Hopper, HopBox and Joey.

According to the trademark applications, Hopper, HopBox and Joey could be used for digital video recorders and digital media streaming devices. It's not clear how the services Dish could offer with those brands would compare to the place-shifting technology offered by Sling Media's Slingbox, which is owned by former Dish corporate parent EchoStar (Nasdaq: SATS).

"We routinely submit trademark filings to support our products and services," Dish spokesman Marc Lumpkin said Monday afternoon. He declined to comment on how the company may use the Ollo, Hopper, HopBox and Joey brands.

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